Why McKinsey Says Link the Customer Experience to Value

Posted March 10, 2018 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

“Many customer-experience transformations stall because leaders can’t show how these efforts create value. Patiently building a business case can fund them, secure buy-in, and build momentum.”__McKinsey

Joel Maynes and Alex Rawson, Partner at McKinsey go on to say:

  • “The road to failed customer-experience programs is paved with good intentions. Executives are quick to see the end-game benefits of a customer-centric strategy: more satisfied customers, increased loyalty, a lower cost to serve, and more engaged employees. But they often fail to understand clearly what a superior customer experience is worth and exactly how it will generate value.”
  • “Without a quantified link to value and a sound business case, such efforts often can’t show early gains, build momentum among functional executives, and earn a seat at the strategy table. They stall before they ever really get going. When establishing a link to value is done well, it provides a clear view of what matters to customers, where to focus, and how to keep the customer experience high on the list of strategic priorities.”

 

Lyn Hunsaker in CustomerThink said Customer experience value creation occurs when you empower customers to achieve their goals with greater satisfaction in a win-win approach

I said in CustomerThink, CX is one aspect of creating value. But in the case of a CVA (Customer Value Added) measurement, the questions are asked of the decision maker, not the user who has been in the transaction. The decision maker may not have had transactional experience, but he has an impression of the difference between competing offers. And the decision maker makes the decision.

Michael Hinshaw in CMO Magazine states for the past several years, improving customer experience (CX) has been rightfully viewed as one of the most important things any organization can do to drive value. And Jim Carrass of Customer Value Creation International (CustomerValueCreation.org) sent a link to me about Customer Value Creation, making me think about Customer Value (CV).

  • CV tells us why people buy, and why they do not buy from our company
  • Creating better Customer Value will increase your market share. Delivering a great experience should give you a bigger market share. Is your company getting a larger market share with the experience it is delivering? If not, ask why not?
  • Customer Value tells you how to create value faster/better than competitors, a core idea that is missing in CX. You cannot just increase CX for your customers. Your company’s CX has to be better than the CX competition provides to its customers
  • Customer Value gives you implied weights of what is important to the Customer
  • How companies are able to get out in front of their competitors and stay there
  • Customer Value is inclusive. It includes CX, Customer success, Customer effort, customer journey, Value Proposition and so on. It includes cost, benefits, experience, emotions. Great CX enhances Customer Value

 

Sometimes, we do not have an experience with a product or service, but we still buy it on the basis of the value it delivers. Often we do not notice the experience because it remains embedded. Take salt; we do not directly experience it. We experience it when it is missing, or in excess.

The goal of many organisations is to create value for the customer. Service-dominant logic‘s specific goal is to co-create value for the customer. The goal of the Customer Success Association is to Create Customer Value. Customer Experience impacts customer value and so is very important. Customer experience seeks to increase value through every interaction. Annette Franz, Founder/CEO, CX Journey Inc. states the value that CXPA offers resides in both education and networking.

CXPA says that companies recognize the importance of value as a key ingredient in building and maintaining customer loyalty. CXPA does not mention experience as a key benefit to members.

CX is also a key ingredient in creating Customer Value

Let me give you an example of a pesticide company which had excellent satisfaction scores, and were working on improved customer experience. Over two years, while scores increased, market share and sales did not increase. They then embarked on a Customer Value creation program and started a courtesy system (where their employees started to be courteous to each other in the office). Along with the courtesy system, they started customer circles for frontline people to align them to the customer and deliver greater value. They also started an evening meeting to pick up and discuss issues that customers faced during the day, opportunities with customers and possible new accounts. They found that those people who were setting up appointments for the field staff were not noting down complete addresses, and were haphazard about ensuring that field staff did not have to criss-cross the town to get from one customer to another.

After 3 months, they found sales call per field person had increased from 3 per day to 5 per day; sales per salesperson had increased by 30%; market share had gone up because of new acquisitions; on time support had improved. All this because of a customer value focus on customers, and starting customer circles for frontline people. The customer value-added score before and after the 3 month period had improved considerably. The satisfaction score had improved marginally because of on-time service improvement.

This is exactly what Mckinsey had suggested at the beginning of this article would happen with a greater focus on customers: more satisfied customers, increased loyalty, a lower cost to serve, and more engaged employees.

What should business people and companies do?

  • Continue to deliver great experience and satisfaction to your Customers
  • Give a great experience to your employees and partners. Recognise Customer Experience is one aspect of Customer Value
  • Recognise that this is not enough. You have to be better than your competition — You must deliver more customer value to your customers than your competition delivers to its customers.

Remember relative Customer Value Added relates to business results. Customer Value includes the image of the company, the company people, the relationship, the product, and the costs (both price and non-price)

 

Gautam Mahajan

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founding Editor of Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 9810060368
mahajangautam.mahajan@gmail.comcustomervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

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The Productivity Conundrum: Why is Productivity Declining?

Posted March 1, 2018 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

Productivity declined 0.5% in the last 5 years globally till 2017 end, whereas it gained 2.5% in some previous decades. Puzzling:

McKinsey[1] states three factors include waning productivity growth rates in the last 15 years, the global slowdown due to the financial crisis on 2008, and that digitisation has not caught on.

Job growth has happened in the last few years, but not with productivity gains.

While productivity declined 1% in the 1990s growth due to computers and digitisation was ending in 2005.

Mckinsey feels that digitisation and computerization has led to cannibalisation and reduction in footfalls (up to 10% in retail). Transition barriers and lag effects are culprits. Operating and business models are changing and transforming bringing in a lag.

There is a feeling that productivity growth will be about 2% per year in the coming decade, 60% coming from digitisation gains.

I would imagine that low growth in the economy, low investments and changing workloads are reducing the effectiveness of people. This is combined with user unfriendly systems.

Let me give you an example:

I am asked to do more and more on then net like paying bills and e-transactions. But when something goes wrong I cannot access the provider and get answers easily. That reduces my productivity as I have to spend unnecessary time. Companies need to rethink this and think about the customer and the convenience of the customer.

LinkedIn, Amazon, SBI, HDFC, Uber are all guilty of this.

We cannot have a lopsided productivity view: the convenience of the company at the expense of the convenience of the customer. Let me give an example: If on Uber your location is not precise due to their location system, then there is a productivity loss for them and for me. Their map showed the cab was 4 minutes away and the driver thought he had arrived.

In SBI e-statements full details of payments and receipts are not given and it is not possible to get this easily from the net or by a personal visit.

I can go on and on. Productivity gains must take into account the customer also, not just the company for it to be pervasive. If you decide not to create value, you will get nowhere. Except to use robots for productivity gains without corresponding gains for the customer, and consequently for you.

 [1]https://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/meeting-societys-expectations/solving-the-productivity-puzzle

 

Gautam Mahajan

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founding Editor of Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 9810060368
mahajangautam.mahajan@gmail.comcustomervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

[1]https://www.mckinsey.com/global-themes/meeting-societys-expectations/solving-the-productivity-puzzle

Are Value Creation and Destruction Two Sides of the Same Coin

Posted February 3, 2018 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

Value Destruction: Non Value Added Tasks Destroy Value

Companies have many non-value added tasks, processes, events, wastage that are non-value adding. These include starting meetings late (wasting time of many participants waiting for the meeting to start;) reading unnecessary e-mails; correcting mistakes (especially for Customers and in production or in tax reporting); unnecessary travel which could be replaced by calls or video calls; 20 people picking up bosses at airports; not doing legal or moral work.

Non-value added tasks are actually value destructing tasks. A whole discipline has been brought into play where value destroyed has become important. This in of itself is an important discipline because it looks at net value which is value created minus value destroyed minus non-value added activities.

Value co-destruction occurs mostly when there is a misuse of resources, either incorrectly, inaptly or unpredictably. This happens when the available resources are used, say in an interaction. Companies can misuse their processes to create more value for themselves, thereby destroying value for others such as employees and customers. This is planned misuse. Accidental misuse can also be disastrous for customers and destroy value for them. The reader has examples of what has happened in his eco-system Corruption destroys value for some while adding value for others.

Value co-creation has implied that both sides get benefit and that it is mutually acceptable. I get what I deserved. Value is destroyed when I feel I got less than I deserved or if something is unfair.

Or the value co-creation was one sided.

And then there is the question whether value can be co-destroyed. It can, as I explained earlier.

The definition of value is benefits minus cost. Others call this benefits minus sacrifice. Whatever you sacrifice could be construed as value destruction…Ouch, this takes too much time or effort, or they make me feel like a fool.

However, very few researchers have looked into the possible downsides of value co-destruction. The risk of losing customers this way is highly likely, as 40% of customers who had a bad experience will discontinue doing business at the offending firm. To prevent nearly half of consumers from churning after a bad experience, it is therefore crucial that both parties communicate their expectations extensively toward another so value can be co-created instead of destructed.

For Customers

Necessary work is essential for, vital to, indispensable to, important to, crucial to, needed by, compulsory required by or requisite for the Customer

Relevant work is pertinent to, applicable or germane to, or appropriate to the Customer. This is work that can be eliminated without deterioration of present service or product

What work is the Customer willing to pay for?

Every business enterprise has at least eight stakeholder groups, whose concerns must be considered when analysing business processes: customers, suppliers and partners, managers, employees, creditors, investors, governments and community groups

Customer Value added of task: (Value to Customer after the task) MINUS(Value to the Customer prior to the task)

Who is the Customer? Are some classes of work for internal customers necessary? If such work is free now, would someone pay for these services or work?

It is the final bill paying Customer at the end of the entire value chain who determines if the work/task adds value

Similarly, for Businesses

Necessary work is essential for, vital to, indispensable to, important to, crucial to, needed by, compulsory required or requisite for the Business

Relevant work is pertinent to, applicable or germane to, or appropriate to the B. This is work that can be eliminated without deterioration of present service or product

Let us list some of these tasks:

Customer Business Tasks List

The more companies can align their priorities with the those of the Customers and make the tasks that are relevant and necessary for Customers, that is make their business priorities the one’s important for the Customers the more successful they will be.

Customer anxiety, keeping them waiting, ignoring them, Unnecessary contact, annoying customers, poor quality all are a wasted effort for the company and the Customer and should be cut out. These are relevant to the customer as they are exposed to these all the time.

In the example, if the company was to take Customer Value, Customer experience and effort, customer redressal seriously and move them into the top right hand quadrant, then customer needs and company needs would start to coincide.

This is shown in the chart below.

GM Tasks Matrix BW

Gautam Mahajan

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founding Editor of Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 9810060368
mahajangautam.mahajan@gmail.comcustomervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

 

Use Customer Value to Fill in the Cracks in Customer Experience

Posted December 10, 2017 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

There have been cracks in the CX story. And now there is another article by a CX proponent, Charles Bennett of the Next Ten Years, Great Customer Experience does not always mean great business performance.

He goes on to say:

“The theory says customer experience is proportional to revenue. At least that’s what “best practice” thinking has taught us. The better the customer experience the better the business result.

Really? Problem! This is not always true. There is new thinking emerging that differentiates customer outcomes from customer experience. It adds a new dimension which helps companies differentiate from their competitors.

It also explains why some great customer experience companies fall into decline and why some dreadful customer experience companies are massively profitable.”

He examples Spirit Airlines, which has terrible CX, and people say “never again” after traveling it. They rank at the bottom of the American Customer Satisfaction Index, the lowest Net Promoter Score and gain the greatest number of customer complaints, by far! And yet they are profitable, and people buy and travel them. (You could ask if NPS relates to business results!)

Spirit Airlines is amongst the most profitable airline in the world with an operating margin of 23% in 2016 . You can’t deliver that sort of business performance unless customers are buying, and buying they certainly are. There must be another customer dynamic going on.

Another example is Subway, ranked 8th in the Temkin Customer Experience Survey of 300 odd US companies. Yet their revenue figures fell 4.3% in 2015 for the second consecutive year. It opened 911 new restaurants but closed 877.

Bennett goes onto add “You would expect that great CX would mean a higher market share and a higher ROI for your company.”

Very often this is not the case. It took years before companies learnt that Customer Satisfaction did not lead to business results. Poor satisfaction did not always mean lower market share, and great satisfaction did not necessarily mean higher market share.

Customer Value Thinking

All this started at AT&T. In the mid ‘80s they got 95% CSat scores. The Board of Directors was delighted and gave out bonuses. 3 months later they lost 6 points of market share and had to fire 20000 employees. Customer Chief Ray Kordupleski was perplexed. After much analysis, he reached the conclusion that CSat did not correlate to business results, and he came up with the concept of Customer Value (Benefits – Cost), and that Customer Value was always to be measured against competition. Brad Gale, then at Strategic Planning Institute promoted the concept of Value.

Look at this yourself. You have examples of when you were upset with your airline or your favourite restaurant and even your wife. Did you leave them. It takes a lot more to do so. What are the factors that could lead to your leaving?

Continued aggravation over a period of time. Getting a better option (and you find this better option will create greater value for you).

Take my case. I owned a Honda car and liked it. Yet during re-purchase I chose the Suzuki competitor, because it gave me better value, better features at a competitive price. I bought the Suzuki because of its enhanced value over the Honda. In my next purchase, I went back to buying a Honda, even though I loved the Suzuki. At that point in time, the Honda seemed to create better value for me.

Customer Experience Replaced Customer Satisfaction

When companies started to find satisfaction was not good enough, a new term was used to replace satisfaction and it was called experience.

The experience with this transaction vs. the satisfaction with this transaction.

It allowed the industry to re-invent itself into CX. Measurement of CX is the same as with satisfaction. It is not to say that CX and CSat are not important. They are. But they form a component of the value you perceive. We do not expect great experience or emotions at a gas station as when buying a BMW.

We all have to think this through, and move ahead. Increase CX but also the value you provide. Let the cracks not break your business results and you.

So what can you do? The easy way is to do a real Customer Value creation desk analysis of yourself (your product/service) and your competitors. This forces you to look outside your company at the market, your competitors and their customers. Why do people buy from them and others buy from you.

The problem with this desk analysis is

  • It is biased by your thinking
  • You do not have real data from Customers and your competitors Customers. You may not know what Customers are saying about you and competitors’ Customers saying about them. You probably will have to guess and you could be far off from the truth.
  • You have to outside in think (rather than inside out think)

 Customer Value is Based on Competitive Reality

So this was the easy way. The more difficult way is to really hear and capture the Customer Voice in a Value study, where you measure the scores on the benefits (and the breakup of the benefits) and on the cost (which is price and non-price terms such as ease of doing business, price justification etc.). You then can measure the Value (Benefits –Cost) you are creating versus competition.

The competitions’ data is derived by asking the competitors’ customers the same questions you ask your customers (Most people do not want to do this extra step and spend the extra money. They lose out because they cannot compare themselves versus competitors). Short cuts will give you incomplete data, and you will wonder why you do not come out a winner. This is part of the problem of only relying on CX or on NPS.

attribute tree

The data you collect will tell you how important benefits are and how important costs are. You may surprise yourself by finding people consider you costlier even though you believe your price is reasonable. Or that people think price is very important and you do not think of yourself as a commodity player (which the data says you really are!)

CX is one part of the benefits, and you may find it is relatively important or not at all important in the Value study. So, if you did an analysis of budget airlines (the more finely you segment your study, the better off you are), you may find CX is not truly important, and that price and other terms, convenience and airports served, and luggage rules are more important.

Use CX Wisely

Give the experience where it is required. Reduce the need for an experience when it isn’t: I just want things to work (the flight leaves on time, there is no hassle with my carryon luggage and so on). The moment things go wrong (the airline says your luggage is too big to carry on) or flights are delayed, or you have to get a refund, you start to get poor experience; an experience you never wanted, and you will say Never Again, but you will continue to travel that airline again.

Remember your Customers’ quest for Value and a good experience as you sell to and service them, and you will be more successful.

 

Gautam Mahajan

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founding Editor of Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 9810060368
mahajan@customervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

Here is a simple Value attribute tree:

Why Philip Kotler Recommended Gautam Mahajan’s New Book

Posted November 18, 2017 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

Philip Kotler wrote on Gautam Mahajan’s new book, How Creating Customer Value Makes You a Great Executive:

“Gautam Mahajan is clearly a top expert on Creating Customer Value. The key to winning the customer war is to know how to create superior customer value. Mahajan shows you how to do this.” Philip Kotler, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University  

Read how to become a great expert and a success on being a Customer Leader!

 This is what others as saying:

“All too often we read that a such and such a book is timely and important for a given domain and indeed this has become a rather clichéd expression. However, in the case of How Creating Customer Value Makes You a Great Executive such statements are completely merited and valid. The author Gautam Mahajan, Founder Editor of the Journal of Creating Value and President of Customer Value Foundation, has produced a book which offers a potent mixture of manual and thought-provoking philosophical call-to-arms on the critical issue of creating value. The book’s arguments and presentations are filled with excellent examples and diagrams which provide executives and managers with maps to understand and explore value creation. This is a vital text for the twenty first century.” Professor Peter Stokes, Leicester Castle Business School, De Montfort University (UK)

“Value, the personal and individual perception of what a product or service is worth (rationally and emotionally) to a customer, relative to alternatives available in the marketplace, is perhaps the most challenging concept for enterprises and leaders to define and execute. In this comprehensive book, Gautam Mahajan, a world expert in customer-perceived value, the understanding of real benefit is taken well beyond merely understanding the customer experience journey and the effect of pricing. Value is built on experience memory, and the tangible and functional components of vendor-provided products and services; and the book examines the enterprise culture, processes, feedback channels, messaging and positioning which impact customer decision-making. The book offers actionable tools for calculating and strategically sustaining perceived value and customer loyalty. Finally, the author provides two important foundations for organizations to follow. The first is a Customer Bill of Rights, with examples, stating the parameters of what the vendor will provide and what the customer should expect. The second, especially important (and something very few books cover), addresses drivers of employee commitment and contribution to added value for customers. All in all, the book provides needed insights and methods for every organization and manager.” – Michael Lowenstein, PhD, CMC, Thought Leadership Principal, Beyond Philosophy (www.beyondphilosophy.com), author of Employee AmbassadorshipCustomers Inside, Customers Outside, and The Customer Advocate and The Customer Saboteur. 

“Only about 10% of firms are highly effective at creating value for, and from, customers. In this book, Gautam Mahajan pulls back the curtain to reveal why value creation is a critical discipline for every CEO and then backs it up with practice advice on how to make value creation a way of life.

With disruptive innovators attacking every industry, I can think of no greater priority.” Bob Thompson, CEO, CustomerThink Corp., Author Hooked On Customers: The Five Habits of Legendary Customer-Centric Companies

“Reading How Creating Customer Value Makes You a Great Executive showed me how someone with Gautam’s experience could write a comprehensive book on an important topic and provide a perfect level of detail in relatively few pages. Included in each chapter is not only the “technical” information but also a set of exercises to help the reader apply the reading to her own situation. The authors description of the Value Waterfalls and quantifying Value Added should provide the reader with enough motivation to take her business into the world of Value Creation leaders, with the attendant shareholder benefits.”—Sam Klaidman, Middlesex Consulting and President Customer Value Creation International

Find the book at http://www.businessexpertpress.com/books/how-creating-customer-value-makes-you-a-great-executive/

  

Narender Kumar, 

Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 9971288580
narender.customervalue@customervaluefoundation.com
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

Attractology and Business

Posted November 4, 2017 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

“The law of attraction is: You don’t attract what you want, you attract what you are”, according to American philosopher and author Dr Wayne Dyer.

Attractology isn’t just the science of looking good, but having personality traits that make you magnetic.

Apart from attracting people of the opposite sex, attractology for businesses means attracting Customers.

Businesses have to understand how the law of attraction applies to them;

You don’t attract Customers by telling them what you are or what you are providing.

You attract Customers by how you are perceived. You, of course,include you, your products and your services.

That brings us to Reality vs. Perception. Rory Sutherland suggests that we fail to realise the difference between what something is, what it means and how it is perceived.

“The same product can mean different things to different people, and there is no such thing as objective product value, at least when it comes to actually selling products (there are objective costs associated with making the product, of course).

Therefore, we have this huge opportunity to influence how people feel – how they perceive our product’s value – as well as the opportunity to optimize the customer”

This is based on the Ladder theory in our brain. I describe this based on the with a real life experience of being cut off by another car when you are driving https://ed.ted.com/lessons/rethinking-thinking-trevor-maber. I have added a buying example for a new male shaving solution showing a half dressed attractive woman on the cover. This is from Rethinking thinking – Trevor Maber.

The ladder Car example Business Example
1st rung: raw data and experience: note the experience of being cut off by the other driver Wonderful new male shaving item with a women’s picture on it
2nd rung: Filter specific details based on our preferences and tendencies, and ignore all other details: filter in how you feel, tightened grip on the wheel, the screeching of brakes, the blood pressure rises, and you notice the expression on the face of the driver Why use women’s picture, you react
3rd rung: Find meaning based on what we are and have learnt filters: I live by rules, I wait in line, first come first served, and the other driver has broken all these rules Shaver for males should not have a women on it
4th rung: Assumptions based on what we created previously and this blurs facts and fiction: the stupid jerk, breaking rules, why does he think he is They want me to buy and present it to him. Why should I
5th rung: develop conclusions based on our assumptions and create emotional reaction: vindictive, heartless, inconsiderate, we feel angry I am not going to be used; I get upset they use women in the picture. That is his job to buy
6th  rung: Adjust our beliefs on what is around us: Last time I will give in I am not going to be used. I will not buy this product
7thrung: we take action based on adjusted beliefs: Back up, roll up, yell Ignore it
  If then the man comes out followed by his pregnant wife, and he apologises that she has to go for a delivery, you calm down If later you find this was invented by a woman, you may calm down and buy

You notice how our beliefs and perceptions can change based on other facts.

So attractology is important, but the perception process made up of 7 ladders is useful in our finding something attractive. This process can change, and if we want to be smart, we should run through the 7 rungs of the ladder one by one, and our perception will be more realistic, and attractology will work better.

Marketers have to make attractology work at first glance and on reflection, and so they have to re-see their products/services.

  1. Get out of your company’s comfort zone of I have a great product…Don’t become comfortable
  2. Do something to get attention (in a date this is the ice-breaker time), increase awareness
  3. Understand their (the customer’s) reality
  4. What prevents them from seeing you the way you are?
  5. What is holding them back from seeing you as you are
  6. How can they be changed to perceive you the way you are

Or how do we change to be perceived in a way they will find us attractive?

Now you can answer these questions for the new men’s shaving solution. Attractology, perception and rethinking!

 

Gautam Mahajan, 

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founder Editor, Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 98100 60368
mahajan@customervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

The Future of UnEmployment and UnEducation

Posted November 4, 2017 by Customer Value Foundation
Categories: Business & Management

Think of the future

There was a time there were humans, and then humans and machines; and humans-data informed; and humans and machine assisted; and then maybe in the future only machines. One robot called Sophie has been given Saudi Arabia citizenship! This could be a frightening scenario but also an opportunistic one.

I come away from my travels overseas wondering why we in India are thinking of what we should have done 10 years ago, whereas the Americans are thinking of what to do 30 years from now.

If we can factor some of the long term trends into our short term thinking we will become a smarter and will truly become a super power.

By just focusing on now, we will not improve our competitive power, and may even increase poverty.

Kaizen thinking of doing many small steps to improve productivity is now being modified with ideas from the Ambidextrous Organisation by Charles A. O’Reilly III, Michael L. Tushman where they talk about companies exploiting the present and exploring the future. This is creating value from now and from the future.

India needs to do just this. Our pre-occupation with catching up in education, skilling, energy, employment, education and food has to be modified with positioning ourselves for the future.

Energy: Chances are that renewable energy and better energy efficiency will result in substantially free energy

Skilling and employment: Thirty years from now, unemployment will increase as most routine jobs will be lost to robots and AI. By 2040, computers the size of a cricket ball will be smarter than human beings. And because they’re computers, they never get tired, they’re never ill-tempered, they never make mistakes, and they have instant access to all of human knowledge. In fact, Osborne in the Future of Employment feels that 47% of US jobs will be at high risk in 20 years.Fukoku Mutual Life Insurance in Japanis laying off 30 employees replacing them with an artificial intelligence system that can calculate payouts to policyholders. Productivity will improve by 30% and the investment will be paid off in two years, after which costs will reduce further. Most automobile plants have robot systems and Tesla is almost all robotics.

But what is more worrisome, that robots are not potential buyers, and so sales will go down. This with other disruptive forces could be the end of business as usual that we know!

Large scale thinking and modification of our education system to tackle the future is necessary.I will discuss this later.

Food: Chances are that better nutrients and food supply systems will change, and food requirements may also change.

Re-design of the nutrition system may not require the human digestive tract, as auto-nutrition through special clothing, and nanobots going in and out of the skin giving nutrition and removing waste. Nanobots could supply oxygen to cells, making the blood system obsolete, and no heart or lung will be required. What will be left will be the skeletal system and parts of the nervous system! Sound far-fetched?

So this brings us into education and re-employment 30 years from now. But first, let us understand the background:

Technology

Stephen Hawking said the rise of powerful AI will be either the best, or the worst thing, ever to happen to humanity. And I add that once this happens AI growth might be exponential.Stephen Hawking a few days ago stated that AI could replace human beings. He said the result will be a ‘new form’ of life. And if the goals of AI are not aligned to ours, we will be in trouble.

Robot nannies, robot pets, robot spiritual gurus are now available.

Already, AI is playing a bigger role in visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making and language translation.

It also might be this new intelligence will find unheard of solutions. After all the Wright aircraft did not emulate a flapping wing bird, and Google’s driverless car does not use brain sensing and thinking.

Narrative science will replace journalists producing news stories, headlines, information reports without humans.

Education

Eric Cooke, University of Southampton feels universities as we know them now have no future. In 15 years, we will have no students to teach (I think the time might stretch). Students want a good, professional job and degrees are evaluated against employability. But the professional jobs for which we currently prepare students will be done by intelligent machines, and no longer available to humans.

So why would students take on the debts involved in undertaking a degree course as it is conceived today, he asks.

This is not necessarily about technology but about humanity and learning. There is a school of thought that says that if you can be replaced by a robot then you probably ought to be!

Haptic screens (based on touch and vibrations), deep learning, deep qualia (of deep learning and blockchain) machines, sense-making networks, convolutional neural networks, smart network convergence, cognitive systems and cognitive computing to the future of teaching, uncollege and experience university, brain-computer interfaces, nanodegrees, micro-careers, are all reasons why our education system must change.

Experience universities, experience degrees, more hands on learning, applied sciences, intuitive way of knowing, and answering the question, and knowing what are all in the offing.Digitisation and virtualisation of education by following music, news, brain computer interface to learn or teach; Centre for the Unknown; Human centred design, community as curriculum.

Since we do not know the job market in 30 years, what are we to teach? 60% of the best jobs in 20 years have not been invented yet! Learning and working will give way to lifelong learning or learning and re-learning. More complex workplace and portfolio of micro careers will happen

Some of the new jobs created will be:

Productivity counselors, personal digital organiser, organisational disorganizer, personal life loggers, hackschool conunselors (hack rather than go to school), medical nanotechnoligists, digital history analysts, cyber securityprofessionals, medical naontechnolgists, work transformers, social media managers, sustainabilty officers, unemployment service managers, keeping unemployed people occupied managers, retirement service managers, classroom avataar managers, deep learning specialists using computers to figure out what something is, recognise how a brain recognises and machine human interaction specialists,  big data and information speciaists, cognitive using knowledge specialists, bio-ai interface/nanobot interface specialists.

Corporate CEOs should worry, too. For a while, everything will seem great for them: falling labour costs will produce heftier profits and bigger bonuses. But then it will all come crashing down… After all, robots might be able to produce goods and services, but they can’t consume them.

And eventually computers will become pretty good CEOs as well.

The lesson for India is that while focussing on here and now, start a parallel program for new universities based on technology and artificial intelligence, focusing on jobs of the future, and re-employment. We also need an university for the unknown, to bring about experts in handling and managing the unknown (the future), and making unemployables employable!

 

Gautam Mahajan, 

President, Customer Value Foundation and Inter-Link India

Founder Editor, Journal of Creating Value jcv.sagepub.com

New Delhi 110065 +91 98100 60368
mahajan@customervaluefoundation.com 
www.customervaluefoundation.com  

Twitter @ValueCreationJ  Blogs: https://customervaluefoundation.wordpress.com/

Author of Value CreationTotal Customer Value ManagementCustomer Value Investment

Customer Value Foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transforms the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.