What does being Secure have to do with Creating Value?

You know people who are secure and others who are insecure. There are many people with low self-esteem.

Security comes from the way you have been treated as a child. But your sense of security and self-esteem can suffer or be enhanced at work.

People who are insecure or have low self-esteem are less likely to create value for themselves, their colleagues, Customers and for their companies.

Hierarchical companies tend to be feudal, and kill security and self-esteem. They tend to cultivate followers rather than leaders or risk takers, or even Value Creators.

When we try to build Customer Value, we find two things are important. These are pro-activeness of the employees and the sense of ownership of the employee of the Customer. Both these are related to security, self-esteem and how companies nurture these and employees.

To build the nurturing or developing process, we build Customer Circles in companies. The idea came from quality circles. What we found was that a Continuous Customer Improvement Program (CCIP) became a necessity to foster Customer Value and Value Creation. Customer Circles, typically consist of front line employees, with some staff people in them, from IT, HR, finance etc. These circles meet once in a month or two, and discuss what employees should do to create value for the Customer and build a CCIP

When we started these Customer Circles, we found that the employees were neutral about being in them. Often, they thought this was a waste of time. They had been told what to do from birth. Mother said drink your milk, eat spinach, or wash behind your ears. Do not put your hand into the cookie jar, do your homework etc., etc., Teacher said, stand up and say, Good morning teacher, or stand in the corner, or recite your multiplication tables and on and on. And then you joined work. Not only did you have to follow the looks and clothes (uniform) culture, but you were told what to do. Visit three Customers today. So even if you had time to visit a fourth Customer, most would duck the opportunity. Not my job became an inherent characteristic.

And suddenly people like me were asking these people to be pro-active and take charge of the Customers.

So they looked at us, some suspiciously, and others quizzically. We talked about Customers, and we got stony responses.

When we asked about what they thought of Customers, the answers were non-committal. We then asked them to relate cases when Customers made them happy or unhappy. The unhappy answers came first. Customers are irrational, they get mad for nothing. And we walked through examples of why their Customers got mad, and they started to see that it was due to some acts of omission or commission committed by the employee or the company…For example Customer service people visiting Customer’s homes, said the Customer got angry because they were late and kept the Customer waiting, or they had brought the wrong equipment, or come unprepared for the job. The frontline employees started to see why Customers got mad. And the support employees noticed that they had not given the address properly or the landmarks or the Customer’s telephone numbers, or what the Customer really expected to the service people. When employees started to see why the Customer were mad, they were able to devise ways of avoiding making Customers mad, and in fact how they could have made the Customer happy.

The support staff also started to take note of how the frontline person was taking a beating, often because of the inadequacies of the support staff.

The employees then start to examine why Customers are sometimes happy. What did the employees do to make them happy? So they build the Customers DNA (Do Not Annoy) and delight factors.

And then, when asked what they would like to do to make the Customers happy, the employees come up with great ideas. Letting them enunciate their ideas, and running with them builds their self-esteem. This is followed by awareness of the Customer. Pro-activeness follows, because they feel more secure and in control.

The trick for management is to create this environment so that employees can feel secure, take control, become aware, get a sense of ownership, understand, Create and Deliver Value. Your comments are welcome!

Call at (+91) 9971288580

 

Gautam Mahajan, President-Customer Value Foundation
M: +91 9810060368
Tel: 11-26831226, Fax: 11-26929055
email: mahajan@Customervaluefoundation.com
website: http://www.Customervaluefoundation.com

Customer Value foundation (CVF) helps companies to Create Value and profit by Creating Value for the Customers, employee and for each person working with the companies.

Total Customer Value Management (Total CVM) transform the entire company to focus on Creating Value for the Customer by aligning each person’s role in Creating Customer Value and getting shareholder wealth and Value.

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4 Comments on “What does being Secure have to do with Creating Value?”


  1. Gautam,

    What you write about in today’s newsletter reminds me of activity I drove forward in one of the UK banks many years ago. Following a visit behind the scenes at Disney, we saw them encouraging their staff, sorry cast members, to hold conversations that they called “Good show, bad show”. This was a means by which cast could bring into work their own experiences of being customers. What were good ones, what were bad ones? What could be learnt from each situation? How could that learning, i.e. to do more of the good and less of the bad, be “adapted and adopted” into Disney’s approach. Very powerful.

    I often uses a couple of quotes. One is an old Native American statement, “You cannot understand another man until you have walked a 1,000 steps in his moccasins.” The other comes from the magnificent novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, “To see someone else’s perspective, you have to pull on their skin and walk around in it for a little while.”

    I once accused my colleagues of being “institutionally hypocritical” for espousing much rhetoric about the customer but actually doing little to improve their experience compounded by their delight at talking about instances where they had “taken to task” a business they were dealing with as a customer.

    It sounds as though you have found a very rich and effective manner to open up some powerful conversations that, hopefully, will precipitate action that will enhance the customer experience and generate value for all.

    David Physick
    Glowinkowski International Limited


  2. Hi Lot of thanks for strengthening HR .How Important for a Organization as a Line Manager HR along with the Line Manager Unit .on the way everyday our journey with huge rush in any mode of communication always the sound comes in our ear some one is moving one company to another no matter the company size more than majority is only for the purpose of Line Manager unit less than majority is for enhancement of pay or for better opportunity.Which company in the World success for retaining Talent . we have raised the Issue and Solution as well how important for any company Line Manager HR although it is a crucial part for HR most senior people from HR having certain Interest in Research mind engage in such job can make the Journey of the company big to bigger. 2) Creating Value of Customer more or less maintain every where but how creating more value for Share holder is not a fact only its a great subject in current environment to make this practice perfect involving large data management and data analysis sharing continuously not only enhance the interest towards business but also close the gap for binding with business.

    Ashok Jena


  3. Hi

    Sir

    You are very right in all respects.

    In successful Organisation, mostly small but even few unprofessional but large, it happens informally.

    The trick.is to formalise it.

    That would be Professionalism.
    Thanx.

    Escorts Securities
    CEO
    Anil K. Vij


  4. Gautam,

    What you write about in today’s newsletter reminds me of activity I drove forward in one of the UK banks many years ago. Following a visit behind the scenes at Disney, we saw them encouraging their staff, sorry cast members, to hold conversations that they called “Good show, bad show”. This was a means by which cast could bring into work their own experiences of being customers. What were good ones, what were bad ones? What could be learnt from each situation? How could that learning, i.e. to do more of the good and less of the bad, be “adapted and adopted” into Disney’s approach. Very powerful.

    I often uses a couple of quotes. One is an old Native American statement, “You cannot understand another man until you have walked a 1,000 steps in his moccasins.” The other comes from the magnificent novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, “To see someone else’s perspective, you have to pull on their skin and walk around in it for a little while.”

    I once accused my colleagues of being “institutionally hypocritical” for espousing much rhetoric about the customer but actually doing little to improve their experience compounded by their delight at talking about instances where they had “taken to task” a business they were dealing with as a customer.

    It sounds as though you have found a very rich and effective manner to open up some powerful conversations that, hopefully, will precipitate action that will enhance the customer experience and generate value for all.

    David Physick
    Glowinkowski International Limited


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